The Yearling

I was looking for a piece of paper a couple of days ago and found this charcoal drawing tucked into the pad. It was done as an exercise, following the contest guidelines for a contest that I didn’t enter.  It’s fairly large for this type of thing and would make a good double page spread. The idea was to illustrate a part of “The Yearling” by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, that hadn’t been done before – in black and white. This is from a section of the book that talks about the boy, Jody, his father and dog watching twin bear cubs playing in the trees. I’m very familiar with these tall and skinny pine trees in Florida, so I thought I could capture the scene.

the yearling - charcoal
the yearling – charcoal

Show

Show,don’t tell; is a writers chant. It’s hard to grasp sometimes and I found this post by Andrew Reynolds that I wanted to share that breaks it down better than most that I’ve seen.

He also said that, when giving a critique, he doesn’t just tell the person that they need to show not tell, but he shows them how to do it with an example. That’s the ultimate show don’t tell.

Andrew Reynolds post on Today’s Author:

http://todaysauthor.com/2015/06/17/showing-not-telling/

Of course this makes me feel like I should show you something so here is some hand lettering I’ve been working on: Mokie grafitti

mokie letters

 

Remodeling

Lately my main activity has been remodeling my blog/website because I’ve been participating in the Blogging 101 class here at WordPress. I’ve done several things that I thought I wouldn’t do – like change my “theme” and make a new header, not to mention the new “about” page. Still working on widgets. Please take a look and let me know what you think.

In the mean time here’s a sketch I did of Mokie on my tablet while sitting in a doctor’s waiting room, waiting for my husband. I think it was the SketchPro app. It probably could be made clearer somehow, but she’s kind of fuzzy looking anyway. 🙂

Mokie - tablet drawn
Mokie – tablet drawn

 

Laid Paper

Following up on my post about the reed pen, laid paper is what Van Gogh used for many of his drawings. The only laid paper that I’ve tried are a “business” paper that is actually found in an office supply store and a sketch paper made by Arches.

Here is a good article on paper:

https://www.ilab.org/eng/documentation/87-the_paper_of_old_prints.html

Laid paper has a screen texture from the process used to make it. Here is a close up:

laid paper texture
laid paper texture

(If you google images of laid paper you might get a clearer picture.)

Finch on Southworth paper - micron pen
Finch on Southworth paper – micron pen
Finch on Arches paper - reed pen
Finch on Arches paper – reed pen

Both papers were nice to work on, but the pen did glide smoothly on the Southworth paper, a watermarked stationery and there was some drag on the Arches paper.

Southworth, Antique Laid, business paper, 24 lb. – ivory – 25% cotton, watermarked.

Arches Laid Paper – sketch – (Ingres) – 70 lb. – 75% cotton