Pastel Demo and more Tuesday Paintings

Recently I was asked to do a demonstration of my method of painting with watercolor and pastels at a local art club. It was a fun morning and well received. Here is the painting I did for them that I started with a watercolor underpainting.

Savannah - 12x16 - pastels
Savannah – 12×16 – pastels

and here are more plein air Tuesday paintings:

11 Maple St. - 9x12 - pastels
11 Maple St. – 12×9 – pastels

 

Port Salerno - 9x12 - pastels
Port Salerno – 9×12 – pastels

 

Lyric Theater Building - 9x12 -oil
Lyric Theater Building – 9×12 -oil

 

Sewells Point Morning - 9x12 - oil
Sewells Point Morning – 9×12 – oil

 

Ancient Oak - 8x10 - oil
Ancient Oak – 8×10 – oil

 

Palms at Indian Riverside Park - 12x12 - oil
Palms at Indian Riverside Park – 12×12 – oil

“A Trip Down the Loxahatchee”

“A Trip Down the Loxahatchee” by Jim Snyder will debut on Nov. 21 when the Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse and Museum holds the “Lighthouse River Rendezvous.” The annual fund raiser will unfold along the river, at the foot of the museum, on  Saturday evening starting at 6:00 pmhttp://www.jupiterlighthouse.org/jupiter-events-november.php

This coffee table book is made up of paintings and photographs by local artist of the Loxahatchee River and will be for sale in local gift shops.  Some time ago Jim asked me if he could include this painting in the book and of course I said yes.  It’s a small pastel painting that I did on location.

Loxahatchee River
Loxahatchee River

 

 

Cows

The Cow – Robert Lewis Stevenson, A Child’s Garden of Verses

The friendly cow all red and white,

I love with all my heart:
she gives me cream with all her might,

To eat with apple-tart.

She wanders lowing here and there,

And yet she cannot stray,

All in the pleasant open air,

The pleasant light of day;

And blown by all the winds that pass

And wet with all the showers,

She walks among the meadow grass

And eats the meadow flowers.

 

 

 

Publicity!

It’s rare to get free publicity, at least for me it is, but one of my paintings will be in the next issue, July/August, of Fine Art Connoisseur magazine. (not on newsstands yet) http://www.fineartconnoisseur.com/

The magazine is one of those well done, high quality, shiny art magazines that is aimed at collectors.

My painting is part of a photo essay on painting in parks, which is something I love to do.  One of my favorite parks is a local one, Jonathan Dickinson State Park and the painting is one of several I’ve done of the Loxahatchee River. You’ve seen it here before, but here it is again:

Banks of Loxahatchee - 9x12 - Pastel on sanded paper
Banks of Loxahatchee – 9×12 – Pastel on sanded paper

You can see other paintings that are part of the Painting the Parks program on the Fine Art Gallery page.

Also here is the link to the website for Painting the Parks, so that you can see other park paintings.   http://painttheparks.com/

Happy New Year!

Spring Marsh
Spring Marsh

This pastel painting hangs in the dining room framed in gold. The glass is reverse painted in black with a gold leaf border. This view is from the front entrance of The Arbors, where I live. It was done some time ago and is still a favorite of mine.

Turtle Lake

Turtle Lake
Turtle Lake – Pastels on sanded paper – 9×12

This lake is located within the community that we live in.  It actually doesn’t have a name, as far as I know.  Out in the middle there is a small raft that turtles and the occasional alligator sun themselves. Turtle Lake seems like a good name.

The pastel painting was started with a water color underpainting.  Just using the maroon color in the land masses and a rosy pink in the sky and lake enables me to then quickly put in the middle values.  You might notice that I didn’t use any green.  Honestly, I just felt like not using green so this is probably considered a tonalist painting.

Dad’s 54 Chevy Truck

Dad's 54 Chevy Pickup
Dad’s 54 Chevy Pickup – pastels on mat board 11×14

In honor of Father’s Day I thought I’d post this pastel of my father’s truck.  Don’t be surprised if I post it again next year!  It’s not a new painting, but a favorite.  He never finished restoring the truck so that I could paint the “after” shot, but he did see and love this painting.

This pastel is done on a maroon piece of acid free mat board that I sanded a bit to give it a little more tooth.  When you sand mat board or paper (sometimes it helps to rough up Canson paper before using it too) you should use a very fine sanding block, not regular sand paper.  The block is sturdier and won’t make unwanted bends, folds or marks on the paper. Just a gentle once over is enough.

In Memorium

The Official Portrait of the Unofficial Mayor
The Official Portrait of the Unofficial Mayor – Pastels on paper – 11×14

In honor of “Uncle Phil” Algozzini who passed away recently at the age of 82.  This portrait was done as part of the Hobe Sound Project a few years ago – the exhibit wouldn’t have been complete without him, just as Hobe Sound isn’t complete without him.  His portrait is as colorful as he was.  He was such a supportive person that he claimed he liked this painting, but it scared one of his nieces.  Algozzini’s Hawaiian Shop is on Rt. 1 in Hobe Sound, FL.

John Pierce Barnes

There was an interesting article in the June issue of “Pastel Journal”  titled “History Reclaimed” about John Pierce Barnes (1893-1954), an impressionist artist, who was discovered recently.  The pastel paintings that they show on the Pastel Journal website are stunning.  In order to avoid any problems I haven’t included any pictures of his paintings here.

This link is to the Pastel Journal Blog:

http://www.artistsnetwork.com/medium/pastel/john-pierce-barnes-gallery

You can read the story in the following link,  about how the curator of his paintings, Katherine Stanko, learned that the paintings existed and had been in storage since the artists death or maybe longer.

“THE RESURRECTION OF ARTIST JOHN PIERCE BARNES, RCA Worker and Impressionist Painter” By Hoag Levins is here:

http://historiccamdencounty.com/ccnews145.shtml

What inspires me the most is how wonderful his color choices were and his bold strokes.  Many pastelists blend the heck out of their work and it thrills me to see unblended work from the 1920’s.  It is also pretty easy to put together his very simple plein air palette from his work, which, of course, I had to do.  It seems to be very limited, which is great for going out on location.  Possibly, he had a small landscape set – I don’t know what was available in the ’20’s.  I managed to fit all the colors into a small 5″x4″ box – it doesn’t get better than that!

Since I don’t keep the names of my colors, and now realize I have way too many colors, yet, not enough of these colors, I’ve made a color chart of what his palette probably was.

John Pierce Barnes Palette
John Pierce Barnes Palette – it looks a little dark here but see below for actual pastel sticks
pastels for plein air
pastels for plein air – in a little cigar box

If it would stop raining I’d take them for a test ride.:)