Tuesday Paintings

As usual I’m behind in posting and photographing my Tuesday paintings. I’ve gone back to using the painting knife more and am more comfortable with the combination of brush and knife now.

This first painting is at Indian Riverside Park in Jensen Beach, FL – kind of a windy day.

Indian River Lagoon - oil - 9x12
Indian River Lagoon – oil – 9×12

On this Tuesday, it started out as a rainy day at the Port St. Lucie Botanical Garden, but it cleared up later.

Rainy Day at the Garden - oil - 9x12
Rainy Day at the Garden – oil – 9×12

Elliot Museum Show

Two of my plein air paintings were selected to be in this invitational show, which is already hung at the Elliot.

Elliot Show
Elliot Show
Elliot Show
 My paintings that are in the show:

 

Topaz - oil on board - 9x12
Topaz – oil on board – 9×12
Port Salerno - 9x12 - pastels
Port Salerno – 9×12 – pastels

If you are in the area, hope you get a chance to swing by. 🙂

 

The St. Lucie River on a Tuesday

These two plein air paintings of the St. Lucie River were done at the Veterans Memorial Park in Port St. Lucie, FL. One is smaller. I was on a huge boardwalk. Several other people painted from the giant size picnic pavillion. It was a breezy, pleasant day with jumping fish.

Partly Cloudy - 8x10 - oil on panel
Partly Cloudy – 8×10 – oil on panel
Chance of Rain - 6x8 - oil on panel
Chance of Rain – 6×8 – oil on panel

Tuesday Paintings House of Refuge Beach

Last Tuesday, not yesterday but Tuesday of last week, we painted at the House of Refuge on Hutchinson Island, a narrow strip of land called Gilbert’s Bar. It was a nice breezy day and I decided to paint the beach instead of the buildings. The limestone rocks alone are an interesting subject. Even though I had time for a second small painting I still painted the rocks and ocean instead of the buildings. So here are mama and baby paintings from last Tuesday.

House of Refuge Beach - 11x14 oil on panel
House of Refuge Beach – 11×14 oil on panel
Mini House of Refuge Beach - 5x7 - oil on panel
Mini House of Refuge Beach – 5×7 – oil on panel

Met some friendly beach walkers and one dog that was mostly interested in digging to China.

 

Pearce Homestead Paintout

Back in November I went to a paintout at the Pearce Homestead in Ft. Basinger, FL. The property sits on the western side of the Kissimmee River. It was a beautiful day and there was a pretty good turn out as far as I could tell.

These two paintings we done from the dock of the boat house.

Kissimmee River - 12x16 oil on panel
Kissimmee River – 12×16 oil on panel
Kissimmee River Bank - 6x8 oil on panel
Kissimmee River Bank – 6×8 oil on panel

Cows

The Cow – Robert Lewis Stevenson, A Child’s Garden of Verses

The friendly cow all red and white,

I love with all my heart:
she gives me cream with all her might,

To eat with apple-tart.

She wanders lowing here and there,

And yet she cannot stray,

All in the pleasant open air,

The pleasant light of day;

And blown by all the winds that pass

And wet with all the showers,

She walks among the meadow grass

And eats the meadow flowers.

 

 

 

Palette Talk

Originally my plan was to write about Sorolla and his palettes, however while researching I found the definitive article written on Sorolla, his palettes and technique. The article was written in 1990 by Charles Sovek as a cover article for The Artists Magazine.

The article is here:  http://www.sovek.com/publications/articles/sorolla/index.htm

Sorolla’s palettes were different for portraiture or outdoor landscape, as stated in the article:

“Varying with the subjects he painted, Sorolla used essentially two different color palettes. For studio portraits, he favored one that included black, burnt umber, raw umber, rose madder, burnt sienna, raw sienna, yellow ochre, Naples yellow, vermilion and cobalt blue. Occasionally he would add orange, pink or purple, but he usually emphasized strong tonal contrasts over ambitious color effects. His outdoor palette was completely different and included cobalt violet, rose madder, all the cadmium reds, cadmium orange, all the cadmium yellows, yellow ochre, chrome green (since replaced by permanent green light), viridian, Prussian blue, cobalt blue and French ultramarine. In both cases, he used lead white.”

Unfortunately Charles Sovek passed away in 2007, however his website remains and is loaded with valuable information and is maintained by The Charles Sovek Estate.

http://www.sovek.com/index.htm

On the top of his section “Speaking of Art” he talks about the palette based on the color wheel, or a rainbow palette, which is similar to what I use, sometimes less and sometimes more, depending on what I’m painting, but a good color wheel palette in any medium keeps your paintings bright and less muddled.

Sovek’s suggestion is: Dioxine purple, permanent rose, cadmium red light, cadmium orange, cadmium yellow medium, cadmium yellow light, thalo green, cerulean blue, ultramarine blue, white, black.

Personally, most of the time I don’t use the purple, thalo green, cerulean blue or black and try to mix those instead. Sometimes I’ll use thalo blue (carefully – it’s a strong color). Also I use Veridian. But basically it does stay fresh and is a rainbow palette.

In the past I’ve discussed palettes for pastels and do in fact use different palettes for portraits and landscapes, more earthtones for the portraits and more of a color wheel selection for landscapes.

Because of copyright issues I haven’t included one of Sovek’s paintings here but strongly urge you to visit the website and look through his galleries as well as the “Lessons from the Easel”. He was a wonderful painter and teacher. You can get his books and dvd’s there also.

This website is also interesting, Sorolla’s paintings and biography:

http://www.joaquin-sorolla-y-bastida.org/

 

 

Seabreeze

Seabreeze - Oil on Canvas - 20x24
Seabreeze – Oil on Canvas – 20×24

These trees are piney and I don’t know the name of them but I like the way they lean toward land as if the breeze showed them which way to grow. This is at the northern end of Hobe Sound Beach.

This painting isn’t huge but consumed a lot of paint. The paint was thickly applied with a fully loaded brush.  It’s a high key painting with hardly any darks.